Moment Striking Students Climb Onto Lorry Stuck In Climate Change Protest

Erika Holt
March 16, 2019

After her speeches at the United Nations climate change conference in Poland and at the Davos forum, she became an example for many young people all over the world, who since have promoted similar initiatives.

Friday's student "strike" in the Twin Cities was part of a wave of youth-led climate demonstrations across the globe. And gosh do they have some import stuff they want to say. It's true that one voice might not have an impact, but with the hundreds of thousands of voices that will be amplified [Friday] when hundreds of thousands of kids miss school and call for action now, I think that kind of disruption will show world leaders that they have to take action.

Many carried signs with messages in English reading "Youth4Climate", "School Strike", "There is no Planet B", "The oceans are rising and so are we" and "I do not want to clean up after my parents".

An estimated 150,000 students and teachers in more than 60 cities and towns across Australia ditched school to rally against climate change in the School Strike 4 Climate march.

Hope co-organized the rally with Love Lundy, a 17-year-old from Madison, who successfully ran a "March for Our Lives" student event after the Parkland, Fla. school shooting last year. "We are not going to accept this". And we joined Regina's Car Co-op for when we really need a vehicle.

"As a doctor, I can say it makes a big difference whether you've got a fever of 41 degrees Celsius (105.8 Fahrenheit) or 43 C (109.4 F)", said Eckart von Hirschhausen, a German scientist who signed the call supporting striking students.

"Hey, hey, ho, ho, fossil fuels have got to go" was just one of the chants that echoed around Nelson's Church Steps as students striked for action on climate change.

Yves Herman  ReutersDemonstrators take part in a protest against climate change in central Brussels Belgium
Yves Herman ReutersDemonstrators take part in a protest against climate change in central Brussels Belgium

Many of them aren't eligible to vote yet, but the people who are most likely to still be living in the world 50 years from now banded together in Montgomery on Friday at the Alabama Youth Climate Strike to demand elected officials take action on climate change.

However, the demos attracted mixed reactions from politicians.

Colourful poster boards and signage have hit out at Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who has been criticised for not taking action on the issue.

"The fight against climate change is going to be uncomfortable, in parts, and we need to have a society-wide discussion about this", said Quaschning.

"Please keep bringing as many people as you can with you because we simply won't achieve our goals alone".

The Paris treaty calls for capping global warming at "well below" two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) but the planet is now on track to heat up by double that figure.

The UN's climate science panel warned in October that only a wholesale transformation of the global economy and consumer habits could forestall a catastrophe.

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